Pelvic Pain

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I’ve had pain “down there” since the surgery…
…since I had the baby…
…since the radiation…
…since menopause…
I hurt with sex…
I guess it’s normal…
It’s just something I have to live with…
How many people have these thoughts? How many people would like to hear it doesn’t have to be that way?
Problems with the connective tissue deep in the abdomen often contributes to back pain, abdominal distress and pain associated with the muscular fascia of the pelvic floor. The pelvic floor consists of the muscles and ligaments on the underside of the pelvis that support the bladder, colon, and reproductive organs. It plays a big part in core stability and is often the missing piece in core training.
Collectively, the pelvic floor muscles are called the levator ani. When these muscles are in spasm, they can be very painful if touched directly, as with tight clothing, or stretched, as with sex or a vaginal medical exam. They can also refer pain into the groin and lower abdomen. This condition is called Pelvic Floor Dysfunction, PFD, and is generally diagnosed by a gynecologist or a pelvic floor physical therapist. PFD affects as many as 1 in 3 American women, and is most common in women who have had children, hormonal declines associated with menopause, or surgery in the pelvic floor region. The pain associated with PFD is often a combination of symptoms including: muscle dysfunction; connective tissue dysfunction; back, pelvic or hip dysfunction; and even issues with the gut.
PFD can result from local trauma, local infection, inflammation or scar tissue formation following surgery or endometriosis. PFD can also result from irritation of areas outside the pelvic floor itself, such as fascial restrictions from the legs, hips or back that put tension on the connective tissue of the pelvic floor. The frustrating thing for those with pelvic pain is that it can occur and persist even when diagnostic testing fails to show there is a problem.
Strain Counterstrain Therapy uses techniques to remove the restrictions in the deep fascia that can be part of this pain. This approach goes beyond the traditional interventions of exercise, biofeedback and modalities.

Christine Wood About Christine Wood

Christine Wood, PT, DPT lives in Augusta County in the heart of Virginia’s beautiful Shenandoah Valley with her husband and children. With over 20 years of experience as a Physical Therapist, her hands have brought healing and pain relief to thousands of clients.